Paper Title
THE ROLE OF OVERSIGHT IN STRENGTHENING EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN NIGERIA
Author
Mathew Elochukwu Ugwueze
Section
Law, Leadership, and Social Sciences
Abstract

The application of oversight is a veritable weapon used by every parliamentary government throughout the globe to make the other two arms of government to be alive to their responsibilities. Though, in several quarters, the use of oversight is seen as an avenue to witch-hunt the executive arm of government, this is not so, because the major objective behind the execution of oversight is to ‘ginger’ the organ charged with the job of execution of government policies and programmes to sit up. Anything short of oversight, the government business will be in a doldrum. On the educational side, the oversight function has strengthened teaching and learning. Further to this, teaching of science in our schools is saddled with numerous problems, of which this paper has attempted to address.

Keywords
oversight, parliamentary government, power separation, education, development

Introduction

According to Gillon (2001), oversight is a tool adopted and used by the legislative arm of the government to checkmate the actions and inactions of the executive. It can be said that the infusion of oversight into the democratic governance no doubt engenders seriousness in the execution of projects, making it possible for the executive to live up to the expectations of the people. Unfortunately, this oversight function of the legislature instills fear into the leadership of the Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) of the government. This fear is unnecessary; oversight is not as they thought. In his own contribution, Ambika (2001) opined that the salient objective of the oversight embarked on by the parliament is to ensure that the executive in the process of execution of their roles live up to their responsibility. Similarly, David (2001) opines as follows: “…the legislators are not there to witch-hunt anyone. We engage in oversight to see that the public goal is achieved.” (p. 13)

 

In this regard, Vanguard (2003), citing a former Deputy Speaker of the House of Representatives, states thus: “…it is erroneous for anybody to think that the legislature is there to fight the executive. We have one government, but three arms of one government, not three governments.” (p. 35). The legislature and the executive are not at loggerheads.

 

Download the rest of the work from the link below the references

Refrences

Akinyanju, P. (2013). Challenges confronting science education in Nigeria. Professorial Lecture, Dept of Microbiology, University of Ilorin.

 

Ambika, S. (MP) (2001). Battling corruption: Strengthening parliament’s oversight role. Paper delivered at the 17th first plenary subject A – 10 Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference, Austria, 3-14 Sept, 2001. Retrieved from Journal of the Parliaments of the Commonwealth.

 

David, J. B. (MP) (2001). Battling corruption: Strengthening parliament’s oversight role. Paper delivered at the 17th first plenary subject A – 10 Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference, Austria, 3-14 Sept, 2001. Retrieved from Journal of the Parliaments of the Commonwealth.

 

Gillon, C. (MP) (2001). Battling corruption: Strengthening parliament’s oversight role. A paper delivered at the 17th first plenary subject A – 10 Commonwealth Parliamentary Conference, Austria, 3-14 Sept, 2001, Retrieved from Journal of the Parliaments of the Commonwealth.

 

Ome, E. (2015), Legislature-Executive relations. Paper delivered during a legislative workshop for the Honourable Members of the Enugu State House of Assembly, 29th June-1st July, 2015 at Nike Lake Hotels, Enugu.

Vanguard (2003, June 19). Citing Nigeria’s former Deputy Speaker, House of Representatives, p. 35

 

Walker (1988). The Rule of Law, foundation of a constitutional democracy. Mebourne: University Press

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